'Superman' actress Margot Kidder no more

After three marriages and thousands of dollars in medical bills, Kidder found herself homeless in 1996 as she struggled with bipolar disorder.

Famous for her role as Lois Lane in 1978’s ‘Superman’, Margot Kidder, passed away at her home in Montana on Sunday.

According to a leading news channel her manager confirmed that the 69-yr-old actress died peacefully in her sleep.

Born in Canada, Kidder made her professional acting debut on the TV series "Wojeck" in 1969 and debuted in films with 1968 Canadian movie "The Best Damn Fiddler from Calabogie to Kaladar."

But playing scrappy reporter and Superman's love interest Lois Lane was her breakout role.

She starred opposite Christopher Reeve's Clark Kent and his alter ego Superman in the original film as well as the three sequels: "Superman II" in 1980, "Superman III" in 1983 and "Superman IV: The Quest for Peace" in 1987.

In 2016, Kidder told entertainment website that her chemistry with Reeve was authentic "because we came from similar backgrounds and he looked like one of my brothers."

Kidder told that she thought the film would be a flop.

"Nothing prepares anyone for that sudden thing of being world famous, it was such a shock. It wasn't something I really liked or something I was very good at. I didn't realize how good the movie was until I seen it at the premier in Washington."

She also starred in "The Amityville Horror" in 1979 and worked steadily in television and on stage.

After three marriages and thousands of dollars in medical bills, Kidder found herself homeless in 1996 as she struggled with bipolar disorder.

Her story grabbed the hearts of fans and Hollywood with many reaching out to help Kidder, who eventually got back on her feet and went on to become a mental health advocate.

May her soul rest in peace.

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