World Tourism Day: Contingent leaves to explore Gartang Gali; ancient route to Tibet

The famous 105 meter wooden Gartang Gali Bridge is known to be an ancient trade route to Tibet believed to be built by Peshawar Pathans.

On the occasion of World Tourism Day, September 27, a team of 40 members started its expedition Gartang Gali in Nelong Valley in Uttarakhand’s Uttarkashi district near Indo-China border.

The famous 105 meter wooden Gartang Gali Bridge is known to be an ancient trade route to Tibet believed to be built by Peshawar Pathans.

Gartang Gali bridge is at a distance of 90 km from Uttarkashi. The expedition members will also visit Jadung village, another 60 km away and are expected to return to Uttarkashi Monday afternoon after a 300-km round trip.

The bridge has been damaged over the years after it fell into disuse following the Indo-China war in 1962 when it was declared off-limits. Since 2015, restricted tourism under special permission from the Centre has been allowed in the area.

The 40 member team also include people from communities that lived in Gartang Gali area but were displaced and rehabilitated after the bridge was declared off-limits.

The expedition was organized by adventure sports company Where Eagles Dare, Uttarkashi district hotel association and the Anagha Mountain Association. The expedition was flagged off by circle officer of Uttarkashi police station, Dewan Singh Mehta.

The three orgainsations sought permission from the district administration, forest department and tourism department for the expedition. Only after that, the expedition members were allowed to visit till Nelong valley and the starting point of Gartang Gali during the day.

Ajay Puri, convenor of the Anagha Mountain Association, said that Gartang Gali is a unique engineering specimen.

“Gartang Gali was the main route of Indo-Tibet trade. It is said that during the Indo-China war in 1962 locals from the Jad community from the areas of Nelong and Jadung were displaced and shifted to Bagori and Dunda villages of Harsil valley. Through this expedition, we are trying to bring in the forefront the culture of the Jad community,” said Puri.


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